Posted in Film, Friday, Personal Observations

#Friday 20.0: Netflix Movies: Turbans and Profanity

Each week I will (try and) share a small segment of something useful I learnt. While this is for my own amusement I hope it resonates with my lovely readers.

I spotted lots of Turbans

I recall watching the movie Inside Man a very long time ago, a film that I have watched many times over. But what added more delight for me was spotting a Turbaned Sikh appearing in the movie. That man was actor and producer Waris Ahluwalia. Here is a scene from the movie. I can’t explain the delight whenever I see a Turbaned Sikh on screen. It’s a joy many immigrants must have experienced in Britain whenever a Turban wearing Sikh was seen on television (which wasn’t very often).

Over the weekend we were flicking through Netflix and came across an old movie called The Terminal. I’d seen most Tom Hanks movies so not sure how this one escaped me, but I’d heard it was a good family movie. So we all made a movie night of this one. I won’t spoil it, but highly recommend this one if you haven’t seen it. By the end of the movie, not only were we glad for the main character in the film but overjoyed that we may just have spotted the most amount of turbaned Sikhs in the movie. If I wasn’t mistaken, we counted 7. That’s the most I’ve seen in a Hollywood movie…see the film…was I right?

Tom Hanks masterful as ever

AK vs AK

So another Netflix movie session, how else do we fill the time during Tier 4 restrictions here in the UK. This time we come across the following movie:

This Bollywood movie follows the spat between director AK and movie star Anil Kapoor. In the film the disgruntled director kidnaps Anil’s daughter and then follows him with LIVE camera as Anil frantically tries to find his daughter. On concept I’d give the film 7/10 but that drops sharply because of the amount of swearing in the movie. As the movie goes on, profanity such f***(+ er) and m*****f***** become common place – it’s overload. I had a similar complaint when Sacred Games was released on Netflix a few years ago, the use of profanity was excessive. Come on AK, just because it’s Netflix, you don’t have to swear!

Have a safe and healthy 2021 peeps

Posted in Film, Friday, Personal Observations

#Friday 18.0: Some films just pull me in…everytime

Each week I will (try and) share a small segment of something useful I learnt. While this is for my own amusement I hope it resonates with my lovely readers.

When I put off sleeping on time

It’s nearing 22.30 and I put the leftovers in the fridge. Then turning off the kitchen lights I head to turn off the TV. An advert appears stating the next movie is Good Will Hunting.

“Great film that” I tell myself.

“I’ll catch the first 15 minutes and then head to bed”.

It’s nearing 23.50 and the film is reaching its epic climax, that final confrontation (no spoiler alert). Once again I’ve fallen foul of being sucked in to a great movie. That’s view number 8 I think….

I can add Deads Poets Society and The Godfather to the list of “keep me up films”.

Is there a movie that would keep you glued instead of going to bed?

Posted in Film

Film Review: Joggers Park

“…it’s a falling in love, and falling itself is a negative concept…..”

Joggers Park is a 2003 Indian cinema release and is the second time I have seen this movie.  The movie tracks a married retired judge, Justice Chatterjee played by Victor Banerjee  and his infatuation with a young women called Jenny, played by Perizaad Zorabian. It also draws a nice parallel with Chatterjee’s teenage grand-daughter, whose love life slowly progresses downwards while his moves upwards.  While she thinks her life is ending because of her whirl-wind love life, its ironic that My Chatterjee feels his life has only just began. 

A majority of the movie moves at a nice steady pace however Jenny is like a constant wind, happy yet troubled, fast, active, injecting colour and vigour to everyone she comes into contact.  Jenny and Mr Chatterjee’s meeting occurs at Joggers Park, a place where people jog.  You can be mistaken to think that Jenny herself leads Mr Chatterjee on, however later in the movie she does admit to her using him because of his position.

His feelings are very apparent however throughout the movie one is never sure how Jenny feels – is her love more out of respect because Mr Chatterjee is not like her previous boyfriends? 

When the situation comes at a cross-roads, he has to make a decision, does he follow his heart or ignore his feelings and live by the very words and honour that he instructs others.

The movie has a lovely soundtrack which consistently plays in the background and is a fantastic tribute to the movie, the plot and more importantly the unfolding emotions, sung by the great Adnan Sami.

Posted in Film

More “Item Songs” in Bollywood mean India is getting raunchy then ever!

“An item number or an item song in Indian cinema, is a musical performance that has little to do with the film in which it appears, but is presented to showcase beautiful dancing women in very revealing clothes, to lend support to the marketability of the film” Wikipedia definition

For those reading this post, who have little or no knowledge of Indian Cinema (now referred to as Bollywood), you will be pleased to know that by the end you will have learnt something new, the growing trend of “Item Songs”.  This is not a history lesson in Indian Cinema, but merely my observation and the bravery (or stupidity) of directors to gradually push the boundaries

As a young lad, I recall sitting with my parents watching Bollywood movies (nothing wrong with that) and left wondering why a certain women would do a song sequence and then never appear in the rest of the film.  I recall that at that time, it was Helen who was the most popular women to appear in these so-called Item numbers.  Now Helen never looked like your typical Indian filmi chick, why, because firstly she was not full-blooded Indian and secondly she had apparent brown hair that was very continental looking.   The images below may support my observation.

I have to admit that watching Helen back then was just what a growing boy like me appreciated, something to catch the eye, get the chemicals flowing (steady on potato).  However, Helen was very elegant and graceful in her performance, she kept her dignity.  Also, she suited performing the “item number” sequence, it was just so her.  To those new, here’s a glimpse, to those experienced like me, here’s a quick trip down memory lane:

 

 

 

 

Recently the flood gates have opened in terms of “item songs” and what’s more interesting is how raunchy they have become and how they are being performed by reputable actresses within the industry. 

Back in 1993 when I was in India, I recall there was a widespread ban on the song Choli Ke Peeche Kya Hai from the film Khalnayak.  The ban was the result of female college students up and down the country complaining about their male counterparts singing the song to them in a very provocative manner.  I saw the movie when I came back and had to admit it was so gracefully pulled off by the fantastic Madhuri Dixit.  It was however, the start of things to come.

When I went to India just this February, the most popular song on the dance floor was “Chikni Chameli”, from the movie Agneepath.  Now I hadn’t seen the video to this song but instantly fell in love with the song [singing it now].  When I saw the video, I was amazed, some of the dance moves and close up shots were a little naughty, see for yourself.

In today’s climate, I would say that the past consistency of Helen has now been replaced by the very popular Malaika Arora.

You can look past a nation which openly illustrates a passion pushing the boundaries in a legitimate way, for it’s all there above the surface and the inhabitants are very open about it all.  However, there is something very sinister about a nation who does not tolerate the freedom to express one’s body and emotions in public, but fuelling those burning passions through their film industry.

So here’s to all those street traders, rickshaw drivers, 3-wheeler drivers, foot-path rouges, gunda-Don’s who line up the front seats of the cinema hall, whistle and dream to their hearts content at the Indian beauty strutting her stuff across the screen while being watched with hungry eyes.

 Here are some picks from 2011 and 2012, you will see a common theme.

Posted in Film

A movie quote that will always be your No.1, no matter what!

Ok, so this is not my No.1 quote but might be for a lot of other people, however I am interested in knowing why a particular movie quote is your all time favourite? Continue reading “A movie quote that will always be your No.1, no matter what!”